joke

joke, jest, jape, quip, witticism, wisecrack, crack, gag are comparable when they mean a remark, story, or action intended to evoke laughter.
Joke, when applied to a story or remark, suggests something designed to promote good humor and especially an anecdote with a humorous twist at the end; when applied to an action, it often signifies a practical joke, usually suggesting a fooling or deceiving of someone at his expense, generally though not necessarily good humored in intent
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everyone knows the old joke, that "black horses eat more than white horses," a puzzling condition which is finally cleared up by the statement that "there are more black horses"— Reilly

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issues had become a hopeless muddle and national politics a biennial jokeWecter

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a child hiding mother's pocketbook as a joke

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the whole tale turns out to be a monstrous joke, a deception of matchless cruelty— Redman

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Jest may connote raillery or ridicule but more generally suggests humor that is light and sportive Continually . . . making a jest of his ignorance— J. D. Beresford)
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won fame by jests at the foibles of his time, but . . his pen was more playful than caustic— Williams & Pollard

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Jape is identical with jest or joke
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the merry japes of fundamentally irresponsible young men— Edmund Fuller

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the japes about sex still strike me as being prurient rather than funny— McCarten

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Quip suggests a quick, neatly turned, witty remark
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full of wise saws and homely illustrations, the epigram, the quip, the jest— Cardozo

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many quips at the expense of individuals and their villages— Mead

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enlivened their reviews with quipsDunham

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Witticism, wisecrack, and crack all apply to a clever or witty, especially a biting or sarcastic, remark, generally serving as a retort
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all the charming witticisms of English lecturers— Sevareid

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a vicious witticism at the expense of a political opponent

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merely strolls by, makes a goofy wisecrack or screwball suggestion— Hugh Humphrey

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though the gravity of the situation forbade their utterance, I was thinking of at least three priceless cracks I could make— Wodehouse

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Gag, which in this relation basically signifies an interpolated joke or laugh-provoking piece of business, more generally applies to a remark, story, or piece of business considered funny, especially one written into a theatrical, movie, radio, or television script. Sometimes the word has extended its meaning to signify a trick whether funny or not but usually one considered foolish
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gags grown venerable in the service of the music halls— Times Lit. Sup.

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the gag was not meant to be entirely funny— Newsweek

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gave a party the other night and pulled a really constructive gag . . . had every guest in the place vaccinated against smallpox— Hollywood Reporter

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a frivolous person, given to gags and foolishness

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Analogous words: *prank, caper, antic, monkeyshine, dido: *trick, ruse, wile: travesty, parody, burlesque, *caricature: raillery, *badinage, persiflage: jocoseness, jocularity, facetiousness, wittiness, humorousness (see corresponding adjectives at WITTY): *wit, humor, repartee, sarcasm

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • Joke — est un groupe de musique français créé en 1995 en banlieue parisienne. Ses membres fusionnent différents styles musicaux allant du punk rock, au hip hop en passant par le raggamuffin. Activites scéniques aux textes socialement impliqués, les… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Joke — Joke, n. [L. jocus. Cf {Jeopardy}, {Jocular}, {Juggler}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Something said for the sake of exciting a laugh; something witty or sportive (commonly indicating more of hilarity or humor than jest); a jest; a witticism; as, to crack… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • joke — [jōk] n. [L jocus, a joke, game < IE base * jek , to speak > OHG jehan] 1. anything said or done to arouse laughter; specif., a) a funny anecdote with a punch line b) an amusing trick played on someone 2. the humorous element in a situation …   English World dictionary

  • Joke — 〈[ dʒoʊk] m. 6; umg.〉 Witz, witzige Geschichte ● er machte einen Joke nach dem anderen [engl.] * * * Joke [ʤoʊk], der; s, s [engl. joke < lat. iocus = Scherz] (ugs.): Witz: er macht gern mal einen J …   Universal-Lexikon

  • joke — joke·less; joke·let; joke·ster; joke; …   English syllables

  • Joke — Joke, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Joked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Joking}.] To make merry with; to make jokes upon; to rally; to banter; as, to joke a comrade. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Joke — Joke, v. i. [L. jocari.] To do something for sport, or as a joke; to be merry in words or actions; to jest. [1913 Webster] He laughed, shouted, joked, and swore. Macaulay. Syn: To jest; sport; rally; banter. See {Jest}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • joke — [n1] fun, quip antic, bon mot, buffoonery, burlesque, caper, caprice, chestnut*, clowning, drollery, epigram, escapade, farce, frolic, gag, gambol, game, ha ha*, hoodwinking*, horseplay*, humor, jape, jest, lark, laugh, mischief, monkeyshine*,… …   New thesaurus

  • Joke — 〈 [dʒoʊk] m.; Gen.: s, Pl.: s; umg.〉 Witz, witzige Geschichte; er machte einen Joke nach dem anderen [Etym.: engl.] …   Lexikalische Deutsches Wörterbuch

  • Joke — [dʒouk] der; s, s <aus gleichbed. engl. joke, dies aus lat. iocus> (ugs.) Witz, spaßige Geschichte …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch

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